January 27, 2015 / IST / Web Development.

read__books_online

Here’s the good stuff used and recommend:

  1. CodeHS — Personally graded, video-then-program format problems, starting with a toy language called Karel and moving up to Javascript, culminating in you making the game Breakout in your browser. Founded by two ex-CS106a TAs at Stanford from which the curriculum was largely adapted. They have probably 40 hours of really good content and, most importantly, provide you friendly, one-on-one help with like ~3 hours turnaround when you need it. Check out my version of Breakout I made after doing all of the content: EpicBreakout. (1)
  2. Google’s Python Class — Unlike above, requires some set-up on your machine (i.e. you’re not coding in-browser), but still good. About two days worth of lectures on Python with a handful of good problems, culminating in regular expressions (like a custom CRTL + F in a Word document) and a problem where you descramble an encoded image from a website.
  3. CodingBat — Python and Java problems. No frills, just the exercises — probably better for someone with a little bit of background (meaning you know what a function/parameter is and can use The Google to figure out/find syntax/functions you need). The site was made by the same guy who taught the Google Python Class.
  4. Khan Academy — A few intro tutorials (mostly graphics/animation-focused) in JS using a well-regarded library (Processing.js) and then a wide-open project space for you to see programs other people have made (i.e. the end result and the code) and to make your own, potentially forking off of their work. Here’s a game that some guy made that served as inspiration for my version of Breakout: Mercury Subspace. Pretty great, right?
  5. Codecademy — Solid read-then-write-code format of small problems broken into different subpieces. I used their HTML/CSS tutorials to get a basic background before making my personal website (http://www.thenickhuber.com/) and am going to use their stuff on more advanced JS and jQuery when I get to it. Still, their grader is a bit buggy and there’s a large variance in course quality/overlap in material, since everything is written by different people.
  6. Learn Python The Hard Way — Read-then-implement exercises, starting from no assumed knowledge. Good, but still not as good as interactive problems; I gave up after doing ~20% or so of it because it’s unapologetically repetitive, but have read lots of good reviews of it.

 


Share this: